Getting into focus

After my grand rant in the last post I have girded up something or other and begun a new project in my studio as the only way to start is to start.

Last year I took a series of photos  looking up into the trees  in Hotham Park and my aim is to produce a series of fresh work based on these. As Artist in Residence for the Park   I’m always looking for new ways to represent it. Here is the first stage of the first painting and it was good to get going again.

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Monoprinting mayhem

I was asked to run a two day, drop in monoprinting workshop as part of the South Downs Folk Festival. There were things happening all round the town in Bognor but my pitch was in a large marquee near the theatre. Over the two days my assistant, Jasmine and I helped nearly 60 people of all ages have a go at something they had never done before. Our time see-sawed from twiddling our thumbs or doing some printing of our own to being rushed off our feet when several people came at once switching us into manic gear dishing out ink, explaining the processs and washing print plates, rollers and tools in a bucket. It was particularly enjoyable  watching the delight on the faces of children as they peeled off their paper to see what they had created. The two friends featured in the photos had a whale of a time producing one print after another rather like Mickey Mouse in  Disney’s The Sorcerer’s Apprentice.

 

Random Recycling

I think, like me, every artist has a corner of their studio where dubious works they thought were a good idea at the time skulk leeringly demanding some sort of action. Now the sensible thing would be to acknowledge when one is beaten and bin them, but somehow I can’t bring myself to throw them away so last week I took this small abstract experiment and collaged it with random cuttings. Here is the result, a work entitled ‘Random’.

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The aftermath

After an afternoon painting there is the less glamorous task of cleanng up. I use a lot of brushes because once they have been used they are too wet to reuse during a session. Then there are the enamel plates I use when working with acrylics, they have to be washed too ready for the next session though if they are left to dry the paint will form a skin and float off.

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